The Rise and Fall of American Public Schools: The Political Economy of Public Education in the Twentieth Century

The Rise and Fall of American Public Schools: The Political Economy of Public Education in the Twentieth Century

The Rise and Fall of American Public Schools: The Political Economy of Public Education in the Twentieth Century

The Rise and Fall of American Public Schools: The Political Economy of Public Education in the Twentieth Century

Excerpt

Subsumed into this book's somewhat sensational title are the many trajectories—rising, falling, and zigzag—that American public schools have followed since their creation. This book traces the paths of both student achievement and resources over the past 100 years, and it offers reasons why the two have not been parallel. It also makes the case that the path schools should follow in the future is greater decentralization of control through parental choice.

This book started as the policy report No Voice, No Exit: The Inefficiency of America's Public Schools that I authored for the Institute for Policy Innovation (IPI). I would like to thank the IPI, George Pieler, and Eric Schlecht for starting me on the path that led to this book. During the journey, I perhaps have strayed widely in some areas, and the opinions and conclusions expressed here are solely my own. I would like to thank my editor Jim Dunton, who saw the potential in the IPI report and has patiently helped me along the way. I would also like to thank Michael K. Block, Mary Gifford, and Karla Phillips for their ideas and suggestions. Nothing in this book represents in any way the official policy of the Arizona Department of Education.

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