The Savvy Negotiator: Building Win-Win Relationships

The Savvy Negotiator: Building Win-Win Relationships

The Savvy Negotiator: Building Win-Win Relationships

The Savvy Negotiator: Building Win-Win Relationships

Synopsis

Life is a series of negotiations--from who will make the morning coffee to the landing of a multi-million-dollar contract. Each successful negotiation is a victory, but how is success measured? And after a negotiation is completed, what are the implications for the future? In The Savvy Negotiator, William Morrison addresses these questions in the context of two simple, but profound, ideas: (1) We negotiate to set the ground rules for a future relationship; (2) We negotiate to satisfy our needs. In other words, a negotiation is not simply a transaction, but an opportunity to develop a dynamic relationship; whatever the outcome, there will be future effects. If a negotiation is not designed to provide some benefit to the negotiator, there is no reason to engage. Morrison develops these themes against the backdrop of a general evolution in negotiation theory and practice--from an antagonistic WIN/LOSE approach to the more collaborative WIN/WIN approach. Through dozens of engaging examples, from business and other areas (such as home and car buying), he demonstrates the eight key concepts that underlie any negotiation, and offers many practical strategies for conducting successful and satisfying negotiations in virtually any situation. Along the way, he highlights such timely issues as the role of ethics in negotiation and the impact of the Internet on communication dynamics.

Excerpt

Dramatic changes took place during the last twenty years of the twentieth century in the way many negotiations are conducted and in the major objectives of the negotiation process. The purpose of this book is to review these changes, to support these changes, and to help readers maximize the outcome of their future negotiations in the twenty–first century.

First, negotiation changed from a process of conflict to a process of compromise; or to put it another way, from an adversarial process to a cooperative process. Up until the very late 1900s, the objective of most negotiators was to win (and win big) at the negotiation table. The negotiator wanted to be able to report to the principal or boss that the negotiator had won the negotiation. In the 2000s, negotiations will be judged more often by the outcome of the relationship started by the negotiation, rather than the outcome of the actual negotiation.

One simple example of the impact of this change comes from the sports world, comparing football to baseball. During the last few decades of the twentieth century, football became the national sport of the United States. For about 100 years, baseball had been the national pastime, but football became number one. Why? One significant reason is labor relations. Baseball had several major strikes and lockouts. One year the World Series was cancelled. The players did not trust the owners and the owners hated the players. Every negotiation was a win–lose negotiation. The players won almost all the time and they bragged that they won after each contract was signed. Baseball did not grow like football did during this period. The first contract negotiation without a strike occurred in . . .

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