Bracing for Armageddon: Why Civil Defense Never Worked

Bracing for Armageddon: Why Civil Defense Never Worked

Bracing for Armageddon: Why Civil Defense Never Worked

Bracing for Armageddon: Why Civil Defense Never Worked

Excerpt

The creation of hydrogen weapons has made a full-scale war of nuclear exchange impossible to win, because it would be catastrophic for all concerned. Yet, even after the advent of “weapons of mass destruction,” policy makers in most nation-states have so far found it unthinkable to accept publicly the end of war as a human institution. This thought pattern is akin to that long applied to the institution of slavery, which was considered for centuries an acceptable and permanent feature of organized human society.

But suppose that one nuclear power, or a group of such powers, were to renounce war forever in the name of reason and sanity. How could a “first retreater” be sure that all nuclear powers would do so? How could a nuclear state that has abolished its nuclear weapons find protection from possible nuclear attack caused either by accident or through the act of an enemy madman? Can the good will of our “enemies” be relied upon for survival? And how can one continually create more technologically improved nuclear defenses and possess . . .

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