Age Discrimination in the American Workplace: Old at a Young Age

Age Discrimination in the American Workplace: Old at a Young Age

Age Discrimination in the American Workplace: Old at a Young Age

Age Discrimination in the American Workplace: Old at a Young Age

Excerpt

Discrimination against middle-aged and older workers has long been a common practice of American business firms. Nearly all middle-aged and older workers, at some time during their work careers, will suffer the consequences of an age-biased employment-related action. Although the law bars age discrimination in the workplace, middle-aged and older workers are nevertheless subjected to adverse employment decisions motivated by false, stereotypical notions concerning the physical and mental abilities of older workers. As a consequence, these workers are routinely ushered into earlier than planned retirements, are denied promotions or terminated, or are otherwise adversely affected by decisions based on their age.

In recent years, worker opposition to these discriminatory practices has engendered an explosion of litigation in the federal and state courts, but the full extent of worker opposition to employer age discriminatory conduct is just beginning to unfold. The baby-boomer generation now accounts for more than seventy million workers in the U.S. workplace, or just under 50 percent of the entire workforce. A substantial portion of this generation already has passed the age that provides them with . . .

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