Technology, Innovation, and Educational Change: A Global Perspective : A Report of the Second Information Technology in Education Study, Module 2

Technology, Innovation, and Educational Change: A Global Perspective : A Report of the Second Information Technology in Education Study, Module 2

Technology, Innovation, and Educational Change: A Global Perspective : A Report of the Second Information Technology in Education Study, Module 2

Technology, Innovation, and Educational Change: A Global Perspective : A Report of the Second Information Technology in Education Study, Module 2

Synopsis

By reflecting on their current technology plans and practices, administrators can learn how to strengthen their technology leadership skills and develop strategies that will move their school or district solidly forward.

Excerpt

Technology, Innovation, and Educational Change—A Global Perspective provides a unique, invaluable resource for education policy, practice, and research. Sponsored by the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA), the Second Information Technology in Education Study (SITES) Module 2 collected and analyzed 174 case studies from exemplary implementation sites across 28 countries. This research documents the myriad ways in which the integration of learning technologies into instruction enabled deep content, sophisticated pedagogy, and impressive student outcomes. For policy makers, the cases collectively inform an understanding of how conditions necessary for the successful integration of learning technologies vary—and are uniform—across subject areas, grade levels, teaching philosophies, cultures, and other contextual factors in classroom settings. For practitioners, the individual cases referenced in this report illustrate the rich menu of technology-based educational innovations this study provides to the field. For scholars, this large group of case studies collected with comparable methods and equivalent data types forms a rich repository for comparative analysis that can elucidate the relative roles of message, medium, and communicative method in empowering learning.

As the authors of the report describe, at the start of the 21st century our civilization is shifting from loosely coupled, mature agricultural and industrial economies to a profoundly interconnected, knowledge-based global marketplace (Dertouzos & Gates, 1998). Driven by advances in information technology, this economic evolution is the largest leap from yesterday's workplace to tomorrow's in the last two centuries, since the dawn of the industrial revolution (Thurow, 1999). In response, all forms of societal institutions are altering slowly but radically—even schools (Dede, 2000). Since one of goals of education is to prepare students for work and citizenship, schools are attempting to change their policies, practices, and curriculum to meet the challenge of making pupils ready for a future quite different than the immediate past (Tucker & Codding, 1998). Students need to master higher-order cognitive, affective, and social skills not central to mature industrial societies but vital in a knowledge-based economy (Drucker, 1994). These include [thriving on chaos] (making rapid decisions based on incomplete information to resolve novel situations); the ability to collaborate with a diverse team—face-to-face or across distance—to accomplish a task; and creating, sharing, and mastering knowledge through filtering a sea of quasi-accurate information (Peters, 1997).

As this report documents, parallel to the ways in which information technology has improved effectiveness in medicine, finance, manufacturing, and numerous other sectors of society, advanced computing and telecommunications have the potential to help students master these complex 21st-century skills (President's Committee of Advisors in Science and Technology, 1997). However, technology is not a [vitamin] whose mere presence in schools catalyzes better educational outcomes; nor are new media just another subject in the curriculum, suited primarily for teaching technical literacy with business applications students may encounter as adults. Instead, emerging interactive media are tools in service of richer curricula, enhanced pedagogies, more effective organizational structures, stronger links between schools and society, and the empowerment . . .

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