Oxford Readings in the Attic Orators

Oxford Readings in the Attic Orators

Oxford Readings in the Attic Orators

Oxford Readings in the Attic Orators

Synopsis

The 'Attic Orators' have left us a hundred speeches for lawsuits, a body of work that reveals an important connection between evolving rhetoric and the jury trial. The essays in this volume explore that formative linkage, representing the main directions of recent work on the Orators: the emergence of technical manuals and ghost-written speeches for prospective litigants; the technique for adapting documentary evidence to common-sense notions about probable motives and typical characters; and profiling the jury as the ultimate arbiter of values. An Introduction by the editor explores the speechwriter's art in terms of the imagined community. Four essays appear in English here for the first time, and all Greek has been translated.

Excerpt

The Attic Orators present a large corpus and the scholarly work that informs our reading of it is far-ranging. For this volume I have set a rather narrow focus but one that should prove useful to scholars and students in a range of disciplines: the intersection of rhetoric and law. in choosing and presenting this material my aim was to make the collection interesting and accessible to a wide audience of informed readers, including those for whom long quotations in Greek would not be helpful. Therefore the Greek has been either translated or, for key phrases, transliterated. For the special terms of rhetoric and law a glossary is provided.

The aims of the series have shaped the content to some degree: I have not included any essay that can already be found in a recent collection of wide distribution; I preferred to revisit articles that have been influential but may not be easily available (not to overlook those that appeared in major journals). the references have been adapted to a concise format, eliminating many of the original footnotes. For a few of the articles, especially those translated or where the new format greatly altered the sequence of notes, the original page numbers are given in square brackets. Addenda by the editor or translator are also set in brackets.

To all the contributors and translators I am much indebted. But I owe special thanks: to Sally Humphreys for help with the citations in her chapter (which led to the lion's share of the References); and to Jess Miner for rendering Wolff's German (and Thür's) into an English version that faithfully captures both the sense and the spirit.

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