Being Australian: Narratives of National Identity

Being Australian: Narratives of National Identity

Being Australian: Narratives of National Identity

Being Australian: Narratives of National Identity

Excerpt

In October 2005, the wife of Prince Frederik, the heir apparent to the Danish throne, gave birth to a baby boy—a future king. The mother of the baby was Mary Donaldson, a former citizen of Australia. Donaldson, a Tasmanian, was working as a real estate agent in Sydney when she met Prince Frederik at a Sydney pub during the 2000 Olympics. The pair fell in love and became engaged to be married. Part of the preparation for the wedding involved Mary learning etiquette and deportment, taking lessons in Danish and giving up her Australian citizenship in favour of Danish citizenship. Yet, when Princess Mary produced the Danish heir newspapers here ran headlines such as the Adelaide Advertiser's 'Hail Our Prince. True Blue Link to the Throne' (2005). Australian journalists jostled with the locals at the maternity wing of the hospital, asking the royal family and Mary's family questions about the new Australian baby. On a number of occasions, they were politely reminded by the Danes that Princess Mary and the child were Danish. It is likely that most readers of the news about the Danish royal birth would have understood the sense in which the new Danish prince was Australian, even if the child would probably never hold an Australian passport. For many Australians another set of characteristics made Princess Mary and the baby 'theirs', made them Australian, characteristics unrelated to citizenship.

A few years earlier, at a ceremony at Government House held towards the end of 2002, Australian military personnel were awarded conduct medals for their meritorious actions when on duty in . . .

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