Brain-Friendly Strategies for the Inclusion Classroom: Insights from a Neurologist and Classroom Teacher

Brain-Friendly Strategies for the Inclusion Classroom: Insights from a Neurologist and Classroom Teacher

Brain-Friendly Strategies for the Inclusion Classroom: Insights from a Neurologist and Classroom Teacher

Brain-Friendly Strategies for the Inclusion Classroom: Insights from a Neurologist and Classroom Teacher

Synopsis

Many teachers in regular classrooms feel unprepared to teach students with learning disabilities. Fortunately, brain research has confirmed that strategies benefiting learners with special challenges are suited for engaging and stimulating all learners. This book will help teachers
• Understand how the brain learns and the technologies that reveal this process.
• Implement strategies that are compatible with students' individual learning styles and honor their multiple intelligences.
• Improve the focus of students with attention disorders and help them gain the confidence and skills they need to develop goal-oriented behaviors.
• Implement strategic review, study, and test preparation strategies that will allow students to retain information and connect it with future learning. Using strategies that align with research on how people's brains function, teachers can engage all students as individuals and help them reach their maximum potential with joy and confidence.

Excerpt

Historically, teachers in regular classrooms have not felt prepared to teach exceptional students, preferring to leave the job to trained specialists. But times and laws have changed, and most classrooms today have at least some inclusive aspects to them. Brain research has provided educators with a better understanding of instructional practices that not only are essential for students with special needs, but also benefit their peers. These new tools will both help teachers face the challenges of teaching an inclusion class and make teaching more fruitful and rewarding.

THE LEARNING BRAIN

It is only relatively recently that cognitive neuroscientists have begun to study how our brain structures support mental functions. The late 1960s saw the conception of computerized axial tomography (also called CT or CAT scanning), which offered neuroscientists their first opportunity to look inside a living brain. The CT scan uses a narrow beam of X-rays to obtain multiple two-dimensional images of the brain in the form of a series of slices, or cross-sections. From these images, a computer can generate a three-dimensional image of the brain, thereby allowing for analysis of the brain's internal structures.

Today, the three most important tools used in brain research are the positron emission tomography (PET) scan, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG).

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