The Titanic Story: Hard Choices, Dangerous Decisions

The Titanic Story: Hard Choices, Dangerous Decisions

The Titanic Story: Hard Choices, Dangerous Decisions

The Titanic Story: Hard Choices, Dangerous Decisions

Excerpt

The story of the Titanic has been told before, and it will be told again. It is inexhaustible. We return to it over and over, as if we had missed something that we needed to find—either the truth of the event or its mystery.

This determination to revisit the Titanic is a curious cultural phenomenon. If knowing something means possessing a certain quantity of information about it, then the Titanic disaster is already one of the best known incidents in human history. Many people have devoted many years of their lives to investigating what happened aboard the Titanic on the night of April 14—15, 1912. Although they are far from having discovered all the facts, they know a great many more of them than any actual participant could possibly have known. Investigation continues; this book is part of it. But almost everybody knows at least the outlines of the story, and everybody knows its end. We heard it in childhood, when someone first told us that die Titanic was a giant ship that crashed into an iceberg, and most of the people died. So tJhe surprise is gone; it was gone from the first.

Or is it? We may know how the story ends, but there is still something that we want to understand, some experience of life that we want to have. It has frequently been said that people are attracted to the Titanic story because it gives diem the chance to imagine what they would have done if they had played a part . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.