Global Issues for Global Citizens: An Introduction to Key Development Challenges

Global Issues for Global Citizens: An Introduction to Key Development Challenges

Global Issues for Global Citizens: An Introduction to Key Development Challenges

Global Issues for Global Citizens: An Introduction to Key Development Challenges

Excerpt

What kind of future are we facing, and what kind of world will we leave for the next generation? These questions are demanding urgent attention in an increasingly interconnected world, where it is already apparent that many issues affecting people's lives locally have their origins globally. These global issues are as diverse as they are challenging; they range from climate change, to bird flu, to fair trade, to financial stability, to terrorism. Each of these issues affects a large number of people all around the planet. Addressing them requires collective action on the part of nations, and progress has been made, but effective mechanisms and institutions that can truly resolve these issues are in many cases lacking. Much more can and needs to be done.

This book is a compilation of articles by 27 experts at the World Bank, who have collaborated to provide some basic information on 17 of the global issues that matter most to the future shape of our world, as well as on three key elements of the global governance system: the United Nations, the international financial institutions, and global compacts. Our aim in publishing this volume is to help increase awareness and understanding of these global issues among the citizens of the world—and among college and university students in particular—so that they can participate in an informed way in the debate over these global issues and ultimately contribute to their solution.

Inspiration for the book grew out of the Global Issues Seminar Series that the World Bank offered during 2005 and 2006 to university students from Australia, Bulgaria, France, India, Japan, the Netherlands, Ghana, Lebanon, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, the Republic of Korea, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. During these weekly seminars, students from different countries were connected by live videoconferencing facilities for an interactive session with the Bank experts. The seminars were videotaped, and the videos, along with the text materials, have been placed on the . . .

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