The Art and Science of Teaching: A Comprehensive Framework for Effective Instruction

The Art and Science of Teaching: A Comprehensive Framework for Effective Instruction

The Art and Science of Teaching: A Comprehensive Framework for Effective Instruction

The Art and Science of Teaching: A Comprehensive Framework for Effective Instruction

Synopsis

Though classroom instructional strategies should clearly be based on sound science and research, knowing when to use them and with whom is more of an art. In The Art and Science of Teaching: A Comprehensive Framework for Effective Instruction, author Robert J. Marzano presents a model for ensuring quality teaching that balances the necessity of research-based data with the equally vital need to understand the strengths and weaknesses of individual students. For classroom lessons to be truly effective, educators must examine every component of the teaching process with equal resolve. Filled with charts, rubrics, and organizers, this methodical, user-friendly guide will help teachers examine and develop their knowledge and skills, so they can achieve that dynamic fusion of art and science that results in exceptional teaching and outstanding student achievement.

Excerpt

Strange as it might sound to modern-day educators, there was a time in the not too distant past when people questioned the importance of schools and teachers. Specifically, the 1966 report entitled Equality in Educational Opportunity and commonly referred to as the Coleman report in deference to its senior author (Coleman et al., 1966) involved more than 640,000 students in grades 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 and concludes the following: [Taking all these results together, one implication stands above all: that schools bring little to bear on a child's achievement that is independent of his background and general social context] (p. 235). This was a devastating commentary on the potential (or lack thereof) of schools and teachers to positively influence student achievement. In general, these results were interpreted as strong evidence that schools (and by inference the teachers within them) make little difference in the academic lives of students.

Since then a number of studies have provided evidence for a different conclusion (for a discussion, see Marzano, 2003b). Indeed, those studies demonstrate that effective schools can make a substantial difference in the achievement of students. In the last decade of the 20th century, the picture of what constitutes an effective school became much clearer. Among elements such as a well-articulated curriculum and a safe and orderly environment, the one factor that surfaced as the single most influential component of an effective school is the individual teachers within that school.

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