Crime Scene Investigation: Methods and Procedures

Crime Scene Investigation: Methods and Procedures

Crime Scene Investigation: Methods and Procedures

Crime Scene Investigation: Methods and Procedures

Excerpt

There are three elements that are important in the investigation of a crime: the history leading to the offence taking place, the crime scene itself and the skills of those investigating the event. With the ever-increasing importance of forensic evidence in the detection and prosecution of crime the knowledge, skills and abilities of those who examine the scenes of crimes, the crime scene investigators, has never been more important.

As an operational crime scene investigator (CSI) within an urban police force in the United Kingdom (UK) I attended in the region of 9000 crime scenes ranging from multiple murders and robberies to burglaries and stolen vehicles. I have also been privileged to work as a fingerprint examiner in a large Fingerprint Bureau making a number of fingerprint identifications from finger marks recovered from crime scenes by CSIs. As a lecturer and team leader at the National Training Centre for Scientific Support to Crime Investigation I have delivered training in the investigation of crime scenes across the UK, Far East, Middle East and Africa. Now as a university lecturer I educate the CSIs of the future.

The investigation of a crime is like putting together a jigsaw. No one person has all the pieces but some of the key shapes can be found at the crime scene. There is only one opportunity for the CSI to recover forensic evidence from the scene of the crime. The evidence may be of a scientific nature such as DNA or unique marks on bullets; it may be minute such as fibres, hairs or paint flakes, or even obscure such as knots or diatoms. Whatever the type of evidence the CSIs are at the forefront of the investigation and if they don't recover the evidence then a forensic specialist cannot identify from where and whom it came.

This text guides an aspiring or newly appointed CSI through the methods and procedures for the accurate recording and recovery of evidence from the scene of a crime, whilst providing a broad understanding of the development and context within which a modern CSI must operate effectively as an integral member of investigative teams.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.