Teenage Witches: Magical Youth and the Search for the Self

Teenage Witches: Magical Youth and the Search for the Self

Teenage Witches: Magical Youth and the Search for the Self

Teenage Witches: Magical Youth and the Search for the Self

Excerpt

Who are teenage Witches, and what are they really doing? Drawing on ninety interviews with young people who call themselves Witches, have been practicing Witchcraft for at least one year, and began practicing when they were teenagers, this book answers these questions. Teenage Witches are not that different from most of their generation, except that they are seekers attempting to find a spiritual path. They come from both religious and nonreligious homes, although in the United States most come from families that are at least somewhat religious. They tend to see themselves as different and to enjoy that status. Many have already faced major life crises, such as depression and the deaths of loved ones. Before finding Witchcraft, most were interested in the occult. But they tend to be more interested in the spiritual aspects of Witchcraft, only occasionally practicing magic. They participate in rituals to celebrate the seasons and to venerate the Goddess and God. The Goddess in particular is important to most teenage Witches, who identify with the female divine and see her as a symbol of Mother Earth.

There are two mistaken images of young Witches: either kids with pointy hats and broomsticks who fight demons, or misguided delinquent teenagers, perhaps seduced by cult leaders. Counter to such images, the vignettes of Beverly, Charles, and Ruth that follow this introduction are typical of what we were told by the ninety young people we interviewed. Beverly's mother, a Presbyterian minister, died when Beverly was nine . . .

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