The Story of Christian Music: From Gregorian Chant to Black Gospel : an Authoritative Illustrated Guide to All the Major Traditions of Music for Worship

The Story of Christian Music: From Gregorian Chant to Black Gospel : an Authoritative Illustrated Guide to All the Major Traditions of Music for Worship

The Story of Christian Music: From Gregorian Chant to Black Gospel : an Authoritative Illustrated Guide to All the Major Traditions of Music for Worship

The Story of Christian Music: From Gregorian Chant to Black Gospel : an Authoritative Illustrated Guide to All the Major Traditions of Music for Worship

Synopsis

Music has been at the heart of Christian worship since the beginning, and this lavishly illustrated and wonderfully written volume fully surveys the many centuries of creative Christian musical experimentation. From its roots in Jewish and Hellenistic music, through the rich tapestry of medieval chant to the full flowering of Christian music in the centuries after the Reformation and the many musical expressions of a now-global Christianity, Wilson-Dickson conveys 'a glimpse of the fecundity of imagination with which humanity has responded to the creator God.' Book jacket.

Excerpt

Some of my earliest memories are of church music; my parents used to take my sister and me to the local country church at Wotton near Dorking, where at the age of six I was put in the choir, intrigued but totally mystified by the sounds and sights around me—the little bent man ringing the two bells before the service and the strict lady behind us, playing the harmonium with its big mirror like the one on my mother's dressing-table. My private schools developed in me a deep love for the music of the Church of England, but after countless sermons I still failed to understand what it was all for. My only memory of school confirmation was laying bets on how often the chaplain would have to relight his pipe during the classes.

At Cambridge, however, I was challenged spiritually, partly through the love and concern of Simon Barrington-Ward, then Chaplain of Magdalene College and now Bishop of Coventry. Later on, at York, I began to explore the musical implications of my new-found faith. During that time I moved back and forth from the splendour and formality of services at York Minster to the lively emotional commitment of a church just down the road.

It troubled me greatly at the time that this church's life and growth expressed itself with poor musical resources, while the aural and visual magnificence of the Minster seemed, from my naive perspective, to be a façade concealing a spiritual void (see chapter 47 for further discussion). My tentative conclusion was that there is a need for bridges to be built between Christians. If only evangelicals, for instance, could feel happy singing Byrd and Gibbons as well as Graham Kendrick, and if only the great cathedrals in Britain could be stirred into deeper spiritual life…

Since then I have continued to try to work out ways to share my training with congregations anxious to use their musical gifts in God's service. Having turned my . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.