The Message and the Kingdom: How Jesus and Paul Ignited a Revolution and Transformed the Ancient World

The Message and the Kingdom: How Jesus and Paul Ignited a Revolution and Transformed the Ancient World

The Message and the Kingdom: How Jesus and Paul Ignited a Revolution and Transformed the Ancient World

The Message and the Kingdom: How Jesus and Paul Ignited a Revolution and Transformed the Ancient World

Synopsis

Set against the backdrop of Roman imperial history, The Message and the Kingdom demonstrates how the quest for the kingdom of God by Jesus, Paul, and the earliest churches should be understood as both a spiritual journey and a political response to the "mindless acts of violence, inequality, and injustice that characterized the kings of men." Horsley and Silberman reveal how the message of Jesus and Paul was profoundly shaped by the history of their time as well as the social conditions of the congregations to whom they preached.

Excerpt

Like a phantom landscape rising from the rubble of longburied villages, shantytowns, and market cities, the world of Jesus, Paul, and the earliest Christians is coming to life again. At dozens of archaeological dig sites in Israel, Jordan, Syria, Turkey, Greece, and Italy, excavators and New Testament scholars are piecing together the evidence of toppled columns, smashed pots, corroded coins, and fragmentary inscriptions to construct a dramatic new picture of the historical origins of Christianity—one that clashes disturbingly with more familiar, reverent images of Jesus, the disciples, and the peaceful hills and valleys of Galilee. in buried layers beneath the bustling streets of modern Mediterranean cities and at remote, out-of-the-way places whose names are difficult to pronounce and remember, archaeologists of many nations and religious persuasions are uncovering the evocative physical remains of an ancient society where unprecedented material splendor and luxury existed side by side with unprecedented suffering, hunger, and homelessness. As the dust rises and the diggers scrape away parched soil and collapsed stones from the streets, plazas, and buried floor levels of ancient cities and villages, they are bringing to life a long-silenced world of peasants, prophets, centurions, and Caesars, a world in which radical politics and membership in closeknit communities of "saints" were some of the most powerful ways that the earliest Christians sought to resist the power of foreign rulers and to assert their own dignity.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.