Great American Writers: Twentieth Century - Vol. 12

Great American Writers: Twentieth Century - Vol. 12

Great American Writers: Twentieth Century - Vol. 12

Great American Writers: Twentieth Century - Vol. 12

Excerpt

Tennessee Williams

BORN; March 26, 1911, Columbus, Mississippi

DIED: February 25, 1983, New York, New York

IDENTIFICATION: Post-World War II American dramatist known for his heavily symbolic plays, many of which were adapted into major films.

Considered among the greatest American playwrights, Tennessee Williams is remembered chiefly for his works from the mid-1940s through the early 1960s. Twice the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for drama, Williams wrote of lonely misfits, sensitive artists, and the sexually and psychically wounded. His most important dramas are the elegiac memory play The Glass Menagerie, which debuted in Chicago in 1944 and took Broadway by storm in 1945, and A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), about a faded southern woman of grace and beauty who is ravished and destroyed by the brutal forces of modern society. Although his more experimental plays after the early 1960s were neither critical nor popular successes, frequent revivals of his earlier works assure his place among the twentieth century’s preeminent playwrights . . .

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