Philosophy of Science A-Z

Philosophy of Science A-Z

Philosophy of Science A-Z

Philosophy of Science A-Z

Synopsis

An alphabetically arranged guide to the philosophy of science. While philosophy of science has always been an integral part of philosophy, since the beginning of the twentieth century it has developed its own structure and its fair share of technical vocabulary and problems. Philosophy of Science A-Z gives concise, accurate and illuminating accounts of key positions, concepts, arguments and figures in the philosophy of science. It aids understanding of current debates, explains their historical development and connects them with broader philosophical issues. It presupposes little prior knowledge of philosophy of science and is equally useful to the beginner, the more advanced student and the general reader. Readers will find in it illuminating explanations, careful analysis, relevant examples, open problems and, last but not least, precise arguments. Philosophy of science is a flourishing discipline and Philosophy of Science A to Z is a practical and imaginative way into and through it.

Excerpt

Science is often seen as consisting of facts and theories, but precisely how the facts relate to the theories, and what is a fact and what is a theory have long been the subject matter of philosophy. Throughout its history scientists have raised theoretical questions that fall broadly within the purview of the philosopher, and indeed from quite early on it was not always easy to distinguish between philosophers and scientists. There has been a huge expansion of science in modern times, and the rapid development of new theories and methodologies has led to an equally rapid expansion of theoretical and especially philosophical techniques for making sense of what is taking place. One notable feature of this is the increasingly technical and specialized nature of philosophy of science in recent years. As one might expect, philosophers have been obliged to replicate to a degree the complexity of science in order to describe it from a conceptual point of view. It is the aim of Stathis Psillos in this book to explain the key terms of the vocabulary of contemporary philosophy of science. Readers should be able to use the book as with others in the series, to help them orient themselves through the subject, and every effort has been made to represent clearly and concisely its main features.

Oliver Leaman . . .

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