Revolution of the Heart: A Genealogy of Love in China, 1900-1950

Revolution of the Heart: A Genealogy of Love in China, 1900-1950

Revolution of the Heart: A Genealogy of Love in China, 1900-1950

Revolution of the Heart: A Genealogy of Love in China, 1900-1950

Excerpt

In the first decade of the twentieth century, Liu Tie yun (aka Liu E, 1857– 1909), the author of a popular picaresque novel, The Travels of Lao Can (1906– 1907), made the puzzling choice to expatiate on weeping in the preface to what is usually considered a novel of social criticism:

When a baby is born, he weeps, wa-wa; and when a man is old and dying,
his family form a circle around him and wail, hao-tao. Thus weeping is most
certainly that with which a man starts and finishes his life. In the interval,
the quality of a man is measured by his much or little weeping, for weeping
is the expression of a spiritual nature. Spiritual nature is in proportion to
weeping: the weeping is not dependent on the external conditions of life
being favorable or unfavorable. . . .

Spiritual nature gives birth to feeling; feeling gives birth to weeping. . . .
We of this age have our feelings stirred about ourselves and the world, about
family and nation, about society, about the various races and religions. The
deeper the emotions, the more bitter the weeping. This is why the Scholar of
a Hundred Temperings from Hongdu "author's penname" has made this
book, The Travels of "Lao Can". (Liu T'ieh-yiin 1990, 1–2)

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.