Vernonia School District v. Acton: Drug Testing in the Schools

Vernonia School District v. Acton: Drug Testing in the Schools

Vernonia School District v. Acton: Drug Testing in the Schools

Vernonia School District v. Acton: Drug Testing in the Schools

Synopsis

"Describes the historical context of the Vernonia School District versus Acton case, detailing the claims made by both sides and the outcome and including excerpts from the Supreme Court justices' decisions and revelant sidebars"--Provided by publisher.

Excerpt

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses,
papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and
seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but
upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and
particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons
or things to be seized.

Two hundred years after the founders of the United States adopted the Fourth Amendment to protect Americans from unreasonable searches and seizures, a seventhgrade student named James Acton objected to what he believed to be an illegal search conducted by the Vernonia School District in Oregon. The case, Vernonia School District v. Acton, focused on the school's policy of testing student athletes for illegal drug use. In the American legal system, a person is considered innocent until proven guilty. In James's case, however, the school considered him guilty until he could prove himself innocent—by peeing [clean] urine. In challenging that policy, James Acton's suit uncovered the tension between students' rights as citizens and society's interest in protecting young people.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.