Developing Global Business Leaders: Policies, Processes, and Innovations

Developing Global Business Leaders: Policies, Processes, and Innovations

Developing Global Business Leaders: Policies, Processes, and Innovations

Developing Global Business Leaders: Policies, Processes, and Innovations

Synopsis

The widening gap between the requirements of multinational organizations and the strategic and managerial abilities of their leaders, many of whose core experiences predated the globalization of business, has created the need for this book. Editors Mark E. Mendenhall, Torsten M. Kühlmann, and Günter K. Stahl have organized the results of their research- and that of their colleagues in the fields of leadership development, international management, and organizational psychology- for the benefit of scholars and practitioners alike. After surveying current practices to bring the reader up to speed on global leadership development as pursued by the United States, Germany, Japan, and with regard to women in leadership positions, the book's focus shifts to a discussion of effective organizational processes. In the third and final section, contributors analyze the research that has been done on extending human resource management functional practices- such as selection instrumentation, the use of assessment centers, multinational work groups, cross-cultural training programs, and repatriation policies- to global leadership development.

The editors define and analyze global leadership and, in their review of the research, clarify exactly what we know and don't know about developing global leadership skills and what it might be profitable to learn. Practitioners will benefit from the contributors well-grounded insights into such issues as the key distinctions between global and domestic corporations, which dimensions of competency transcend internal corporate leadership dimensions, and how global leadership competencies should be developed.

Excerpt

The overwhelming globalization in business in the past decade was marked by great increases in cross-border trade and investment, the emergence of global products and consumers, an increase in the privatization of formerly government-owned companies in many countries, higher global standards in production and quality, and a massive increase in the effective usage of information technology (Cullen, 1999). These powerful developments have changed the rules of how business is done internationally, and how businesses should be led and managed.

Compared to the domestic business context, global business is more unpredictable, chaotic, and complex. Doing business in the global marketplace multiplies the variables and interdependences that executives must take into consideration in their decision making. Due to these complex interdependencies, every single action an executive takes results in intended as well as unintended consequences that can have long-term positive or negative effects on an organization’s performance. In global organizations the strategic planning of today may be outdated next month, and the inherent dynamics of the global business environment cause ferocious time pressures that exacerbate the need for executives to act without sufficient information and analysis.

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