Drug Problems: Cross-Cultural Policy and Program Development

Drug Problems: Cross-Cultural Policy and Program Development

Drug Problems: Cross-Cultural Policy and Program Development

Drug Problems: Cross-Cultural Policy and Program Development

Synopsis

This comprehensive account addresses illicit substance abuse from an international perspective, focusing specifically on the Middle East, which has developed a singular response to an issue that currently affects every country in the world.

Excerpt

Patrick F. Bogan

Drug abuse is a problem that ignores language, boundaries, political strife, social class, and economic status. The United States is a nation with immense criminal justice resources, public health expertise, and scientific knowledge; however, it is one of the major consumer nations of illicit drugs. Few in the United States are satisfied with the current state of affairs in the never-ending “war on drugs.” Whether one talks about the crack cocaine problem in America’s cities, the escalating problem of high-grade heroin in east coast urban centers, the methamphetamine epidemic in western and midwestern rural areas and suburban communities, or the explosion of ecstasy (methylenedioxymethamphetamine [MDMA]) and “club drugs” among teens and young adults, no one is claiming victory in America’s drug war.

In many other countries with far fewer resources and wealth, drug use, abuse, and addiction destroy lives, ruin families, and erode basic institutions. Illicit drug use is not solely a problem of the rich, nor of the poor. It can destroy the life of a wealthy Beverly Hills movie star as readily as it can degrade and debase the poorest and most under-privileged person in any third world nation. It can devastate the inner core of major U.S. cities as readily as it can destabilize the governments of developing democracies. No vaccine has been developed to inoculate any social class or society from the impact of illicit drug abuse.

At present, one of the best weapons against the problem of illicit drug use is accurate information. It is folly for societies to create high-tech interdiction efforts, prevention programs, and treatment systems without knowing the nature of the problem. As with any public health and criminal justice problem, before a mean-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.