Creative Product Design: A Practical Guide to Requirements Capture Management

Creative Product Design: A Practical Guide to Requirements Capture Management

Creative Product Design: A Practical Guide to Requirements Capture Management

Creative Product Design: A Practical Guide to Requirements Capture Management

Synopsis

Achieving commercial success through innovation is highly desirable, but difficult to achieve in practice. 50% of product development costs are likely to result in a failed product and in some sectors, such as FMCGs, this figure is more like 75%.

What is the problem?
Typically, out of nine month's product development cycle, only two weeks are devoted to the generation of ideas and creative design - the "front end". This is the missing link - insufficient idea generation and creativity management, or the pre-development phase, can lead to the failure of the product.

So, what can you do to avoid product failure?
Requirements Capture is the "front end". It is the processs by which the needs, preferences and requirements of individuals and groups significant to product development are researched and identified. Requirements cature defines:

• Customer, user and market requirements

• Design requirements

• Technical requirements
The requirements capture model constitutes three phases:

• Information gathering

• Information transformation

• Requirements generation

In this book, Margaret Bruce and Rachel Cooper present and explain requirements capture in a step-by-step, practical guide that will enable you to plan and implement the process successfully within your organisation. Whether you produce food products or technically complex products, this book will be an invaluable asset in assisting your product development process.

Excerpt

Innovation management and product development is increasingly important for all kinds of businesses. Internet retail and e-commerce has precipitated the emergence of new Internet products and brought into being new ways of banking, shopping and working. Technological advances and consumer expectations are driving change. in the fashion industry, new fibres and fabrics are constantly available and more casual dress in the workplace is fuelling innovation in workwear. Companies have to find ways to manage product development and innovation to enable them to identify new technological advances early and bring these to the consumer more quickly and cheaply than can their competitors. This demands a review of their management of product development activities. Such a review is reinforced by the fact that nearly 50% of product development costs are likely to result in a failed product. in some sectors, such as fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG), the failure rate is 75%. Improvements to innovation management are needed.

Lack of creative ideas is hindering the development of exciting and attractive products in uk business and consumer markets. This statement denotes the situation in the uk, but is a symptom, rather than an explanation, of this. Typically, large companies have product development processes and project management tools and techniques for innovation management. But idea generation and creativity management are not considered to be a problem. Often, corporate product development processes do not take adequate account of the predevelopment phase or the front end of the product development process; new product development processes often start at concept stage missing completely the front end. If it is considered at all it is treated as a phase or stage that products have to go through before the real effort in developing the product begins. For household textiles, the generation of ideas and creative design is given two weeks of effort out of a nine-month cycle. Creative leadership is a skill that effective managers are assumed to . . .

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