Seasons of Grace: The Life-Giving Practice of Gratitude

Seasons of Grace: The Life-Giving Practice of Gratitude

Seasons of Grace: The Life-Giving Practice of Gratitude

Seasons of Grace: The Life-Giving Practice of Gratitude

Synopsis

Praise for Seasons of Grace

"In this beautifully written book, Alan Jones and John O'Neil deliver a timely antidote to the stressed-out, spiritually barren lives that too many of us accept as the price of success. This is a book that may both comfort and challenge you to change your life and the world for the better."
-Dean Ornish, M. D., author of Dr. Dean Ornish's Program for Reversing Heart Disease and Love & Survival

"I love this book. It is packed with inspirational stories from the lives of the authors and their friends that illustrate how feelings of gratitude for even the smallest gifts and kindnesses and joys help us to live each day to the full. Reading Seasons of Grace will help you to cope with the hard times, to find the silver linings. It is a splendid, joyous, and enriching recipe for life."
-Jane Goodall, author of Reason for Hope and The Ten Trusts

"Most people are grateful because they're happy; wise people are happy because they're grateful. Thank you, Alan Jones and John O'Neil, for reminding us of this happy fact."
-Roger Walsh, M. D., Ph. D., author of Essential Spirituality: The 7 Central Practices to Awaken Heart and Mind

"As gentle as it is wise, Seasons of Grace shows us everyday life as a joyous spiritual art: the art of receiving, day by day, the life we are given-every last bit of it."
-Jacob Needleman, author of The American Soul

Excerpt

Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all
the others.

—CICERO

In 1993 a mutual friend told each of us, Alan and John, “There’s someone you should meet.” This kind of urging tends to provoke anxiety because, as with a blind date, the two people meeting may have less in common than their friend imagined, may even dislike each other on sight. Nonetheless, we agreed to have lunch and learned—in the course of two hours at Alan’s neighborhood Japanese restaurant—that we shared not only strong threads of experience but also a bent for self-examination and seeking sources of renewal in our lives. We’re so inclined partly by temperament and partly by virtue of what we do for a living.

We both “work with people” and between us encounter a wide range of them, from varied circumstances and with vastly varied goals, drives, responsibilities, and responses to life. Alan, in his ministry at Grace Cathedral, talks to people who profess faith (apparently unshakable) in God’s goodness and purpose in the world, and just as many perennial spiritual questioners. He comforts those in despair, prods the complacent to action, urges the virtues of stewardship on the wealthy, and represents his church in dialogue with other religious traditions. He has specialized in bringing together the insights of the spiritual and psychological traditions.

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