Shakespeare Matters: History, Teaching, Performance

Shakespeare Matters: History, Teaching, Performance

Shakespeare Matters: History, Teaching, Performance

Shakespeare Matters: History, Teaching, Performance

Synopsis

"Shakespeare Matters: History, Teaching, Performance is a collection of original essays that addresses three significant areas in contemporary Shakespeare studies: interpretations of the plays in their historical and social contexts; the varying roles of Shakespeare's work in educational practices and traditions; and performance conventions and textual issues from the sixteenth century to the present. In each area, the authors discuss a range of issues by applying and debating key critical approaches to Shakespeare including new historicism, cultural materialism, feminism, and postcolonialism." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, international interest in Shakespeare’s work has never been greater. Numerous films, proliferating websites and CD–ROM packages, significant new publishing series of the plays, poems, and critical studies abound. Shakespeare’s name continues to feature in numerous culture industries both in- and outside the academy. The essays in this volume exemplify the range and energy of these interests. They span literary and dramatic criticism, theater and textual studies, teaching and pedagogy—in short, a microcosm of the wide–ranging concerns and approaches that are the hallmark of contemporary Shakespeare studies. The authors teach, research, and perform in different countries and contexts: Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Korea, Singapore, the United States and the United Kingdom. Their varied backgrounds afford challenging and innovative viewpoints on the way that Shakespeare and his plays continue to be understood and reproduced in many cultural contexts.

The collected essays address three significant areas in current Shakespeare studies: the complex effects of social and historical meanings in the plays; the notable function of Shakespeare’s work in educational practices and traditions; and the plays’ pivotal role, as performance and literary texts, in conceptualizing theatricality, textuality, and authorship from the sixteenth century to the present. In each area, the authors discuss numerous issues by applying and debating key approaches to Shakespeare’s work, including new historicism, cultural materialism, feminism, and postcolonialism. Linking the three areas is a recurring set of critical concepts and positions. Whether the immediate issues in question are the effects of the market in the early modern period (Lindley), the impacts of class and ethnicity in education (O’Malley), or the tensions among editing, authorship, and subjectivity (Bedford), these chapters display a collective intent to explore the . . .

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