Taft, Roosevelt, and the Limits of Friendship

Taft, Roosevelt, and the Limits of Friendship

Taft, Roosevelt, and the Limits of Friendship

Taft, Roosevelt, and the Limits of Friendship

Synopsis

"William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt enjoyed a much-valued, years-long friendship, only to have it break down when, in 1912, they came to political blows over the Republican Party nomination for the presidency. To many it appeared to be a case of personal rivalry, almost a matter of saving face, as the two veteran political figures maneuvered to claim the right to lead their party. A close study of the backgrounds and public service of Taft and Roosevelt reveals, however, that despite years of mutual regard and support in governmental affairs, they were not look-alikes. It is therefore necessary to compare and contrast their backgrounds and training, their mind-sets, and their understanding of the power of the president, as stated in the Constitution, to gain an appreciation of how TR and Will came to a parting of the ways, politically and personally." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

This study of the political friendship of William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt is the concluding volume of a trilogy which has Taft as its organizing principal. The only individual in the history of the United States to have served as both president and chief justice, he found himself in positions to interact with any number of the major public figures of his day, and it is from a close consideration of such challenge and response that the history of his times can be more fully understood. As chief justice, Taft came to gain an enlarged appreciation of the Constitution and the laws passed in pursuance thereof by reason of association with the venerable Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, the subject of the first volume of the trilogy, Taft, Holmes, And The 1920s Court. A study of the evidence shows Taft was less conservative and Holmes less liberal than has been widely argued. Interaction with Woodrow Wilson on the great issue of world order following the end of World War I was replete with promise but was crowned by failure. Taft’s efforts to form a league or association of nations by working with Wilson is the underlying theme of Taft, Wilson, And World Order. Of all the prominent men of the era none was closer to him than Theodore Roosevelt, the most powerful public figure Taft was to deal with and admire, but not imitate. Assessing their interactive relationship is the task at hand in Taft, Roosevelt, and the Limits of Friendship, requiring as it does an interpretation of the rise and fall of a near legendary partnership. Taken together these volumes give Taft in history a better defined image, one of enhanced importance, and ascribe to his counter-partners an added dimension as they carried out great affairs of state.

In this approach to the Taft-Roosevelt story I have drawn on much material to be found in The Collected Works of William Howard Taft, as . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.