Religion and Secular Culture in Tibet: Tibetan Studies 2 : Piats 2000 : Tibetan Studies : Proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, Leiden 2000

Religion and Secular Culture in Tibet: Tibetan Studies 2 : Piats 2000 : Tibetan Studies : Proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, Leiden 2000

Religion and Secular Culture in Tibet: Tibetan Studies 2 : Piats 2000 : Tibetan Studies : Proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, Leiden 2000

Religion and Secular Culture in Tibet: Tibetan Studies 2 : Piats 2000 : Tibetan Studies : Proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, Leiden 2000

Synopsis

The proceedings of the seminars of the International Association for Tibetan Studies (IATS) have developed into the most representative world-wide cross-section of Tibetan Studies. They are an indispensable reference-work for anyone interested in Tibet and capture the cutting edge of Tibet-related research. This volume is the second of three volumes of general proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the IATS. It presents a careful selection of scholarly and academic articles on Tibetan Buddhist and Bon religious culture, including a sizeable section of anthropological contributions. The complete series covers ten volumes. The other seven volumes are the outcome of expert panels. Of special interest to readers of this book are the edited volumes by Katia Buffetrille & Hildegard Diemberger (anthropology: territory and identity), Helmut Eimer & David Germano (Buddhist canon), Toni Huber (anthropology: Amdo cultural revival), Christiaan Klieger (anthropology: presentation of self & identity), and Deborah Klimburg-Salter and Eva Allinger (art history).

Excerpt

This is the second of three volumes general proceedings of the ninth seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, held June 24–30, 2000, in Leiden, the Netherlands, hosted by the International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS).

The spectacular growth of Tibetan Studies and the great popular demand for regular iats meetings may be apparent from the fact that the ninth seminar—even when organised only two years after the eighth—received close to 400 registrations and eventually had 290 actual participants at the seminar. Approximately 270 papers have been submitted for review, roughly 235 of which have been accepted, 215 were eventually presented, and more than 150 now appear in print. Half the papers were presented in panels.

This second volume comprises contributions on religious and secular culture, both from textual studies and anthropological perspectives, and a couple of articles dealing with literary fiction. Volume one contains articles about history, ancient and modern, and linguistic contributions. the last volume contains articles concerning Bhutan (guest-editor: John Ardussi) and contributions on Tibetan Art. the complete proceedings comprise seven additional volumes, which are based on specialised panels at the seminar and were edited by the panel-organisers:

4. Epstein, Khams pa Histories: Visions of People, Place and Authority

5. Huber, Amdo Tibetans in Transition: Society and Culture in the Post-Mao Era

6. Beckwith, Medieval Tibeto-Burman Languages

7. Klimburg-Salter & Allinger, Buddhist Art and Tibetan Patronage from the Ninth to Fourteenth Centuries

8. Klieger, Tibet, Self, and the Tibetan Diaspora: Voices of Difference

9. Buffetrille & Diemberger, Territory and Identity in Tibet and the Himalaya

10. Eimer & Germano, The Many Canons of Tibetan Buddhism . . .

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