Dual Nationality, Social Rights, and Federal Citizenship in the U.S. and Europe: The Reinvention of Citizenship

Dual Nationality, Social Rights, and Federal Citizenship in the U.S. and Europe: The Reinvention of Citizenship

Dual Nationality, Social Rights, and Federal Citizenship in the U.S. and Europe: The Reinvention of Citizenship

Dual Nationality, Social Rights, and Federal Citizenship in the U.S. and Europe: The Reinvention of Citizenship

Synopsis

Dual nationality has become one of the most divisive issues linked with the politics of migration in Germany and the US. This volume, the first one in decades to focus on this issue, examines the history, consequences and arguments for and against dual citizenship, and uses dual nationality as the basis of a reflection on important issues closely related to it: social rights, European citizenship and federal citizenship. It pays particular attention to questions such as: What are the major arguments in favor and against dual nationality? Why has dual nationality provoked such contrasting responses, being a non-issue in the UK, for instance, and an extremely controversial one in Germany? How is dual nationality used by states to influence politics and policy in other states? How does it relate to the aim of integrating ethnic migrants and to broader issues in social policy and European integration?

Randall Hansen is Fellow and Tutor in Politics at Merton College, University of Oxford. Patrick Weil is Director of Research at CNRS in the Centre for Research on the History of Social Movements and Trade Unionism, Paris I - Sorbonne. He is the author of a report for the French Prime Minister on French nationality and immigration law in 1997 and is a member of the French Consultative Commission on Human Rights.

Excerpt

This volume is devoted to the study of dual citizenship. As such, it is the first volume in over thirty years to make dual nationality its major concern (Bar-Yaacov: 1961). For the first three decades of the postwar period, questions of citizenship received little academic attention within mainstream (English language) sociology and political science. Beyond one essay by T. H. Marshall, the study of citizenship was at best marginal. Since the 1980s, citizenship has become a major focus — almost an obsession — of scholars and graduate students. a cursory glance at the major journals, single-authored manuscripts and edited volumes produces a plethora of studies devoted to it. Although intellectual curiosity and a professional need for publication tend to exhaust all aspects of whatever topic fires academic imagination, the massive interest in citizenship has not spilled over into a concern for dual nationality. This is despite the fact that in several countries it is the most important political issue linked with citizenship; it is increasing and impossible to prevent, and both the rules governing it at an international level and scholarly opinion on its strengths and weaknesses are in their infancy. the first purpose of this volume is to address this lacuna. Equally importantly, however, the volume also gives substantial attention to issues, related to dual nationality, that helped place it on the political and academic agenda: social rights, integration, the institution of citizenship itself, European citizenship and the conditions under which the rights of membership can be legitimately claimed. Given the novelty of debate over dual citizenship, much of this volume — including this introductory chapter — concerns both empirical/historical and normative issues. It examines the experience of dual citizenship in certain key . . .

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