The Making of Anthropology in East and Southeast Asia

The Making of Anthropology in East and Southeast Asia

The Making of Anthropology in East and Southeast Asia

The Making of Anthropology in East and Southeast Asia

Excerpt

The idea for this book originated at the Fourteenth International Congress of Anthropological Sciences held at The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, in July 1998. The conference included two panels with clearly related themes: “The Making of Anthropology in Asia: The Past, the Present and the Future,” organized by Shinji Yamashita and Takeo Funabiki, with contributions by Shinji Yamashita, A.B. Shamsul, Xin Liu, and Takami Kuwayama; and “Indigenization of Anthropology in East and Southeast Asia,” organized by Joseph Bosco, and including contributions by Joseph Bosco, Sidney Cheung, David Wu, and Tan Chee-beng. In the wake of the conference, the present structure of the book gradually crystallized. Additional contributions were invited to provide better regional coverage, including the papers by Zhuang Kong-shao, Kwang-ok Kim, and Alicia Magos. The final papers to be added were the co-authored first chapter and David Askew's paper on early Japanese anthropology, a welcome addition given the lack of material on this subject available in English. The original group of authors have updated their papers in the light of more recent material, as will be seen from the bibliographies, and most of the final drafts included here date from the first half of 2004. The jobs of final editing, indexing, and typesetting fell to Jerry Eades.

The editors would like to thank first and foremost Marion Berghahn for her continued commitment to the cause of anthropology in Asia, despite the lengthy gestation period of this particular volume. Jerry Eades would like to thank Saee Haldule and Radoslawa Jankowska of APU for their help with checking and formatting the bibliographies at various stages of completion, Neil MacNeil for his technical expertise and help in getting the files to the publisher, Carla Eades for the use of the cover photograph, and Maria R. Reyes of the Berghahn New York office for seeing the final version through the press. In addition to his own chapter, David Askew provided considerable help with the final editing and correction, as well as his expertise with the Japanese language sources

In the text, Japanese, Korean, and Chinese names have generally been written in the conventional order for these countries, with family names first, the major exception being writers publishing in English, where the Western . . .

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