Elizabeth Cady Stanton: The Right Is Ours

Elizabeth Cady Stanton: The Right Is Ours

Elizabeth Cady Stanton: The Right Is Ours

Elizabeth Cady Stanton: The Right Is Ours

Synopsis

Brilliant, stubborn, and astonishingly far-sighted, Elizabeth Cady Stanton was the chief architect of the American women's movement. Here, Harriet Sigerman presents a fascinating profile of the woman who courageously campaigned for women's absolute right to social and political equality in the1800s. Her stands on issues such as birth control, divorce reform, greater employment opportunities, and equal wages were revolutionary and controversial then and are still debated in the political arena today. Along with her tireless crusade for equal rights, Elizabeth Cady Stanton also raisedseven children, authored a history of the women's rights movement, a feminist critique of the Bible, and her autobiography. Featuring never-before-seen photos and illustrations, Elizabeth Cady Stanton brings to life one of history's liveliest and most fascinating women's rights leaders.

Excerpt

On the morning of July 11, 1848, Elizabeth Cady Stanton traveled to Waterloo, New York, three miles west of her home in Seneca Falls, to visit her good friend Lucretia Mott. Stanton had first met Mott, a Quaker and wellknown antislavery activist, eight years before in London at the World’s Anti-Slavery Convention; Stanton had attended the convention with her husband, Henry, while on their honeymoon. Both Mott and Stanton were very committed to the antislavery cause, which drew hundreds of American women into its ranks. Female members circulated petitions to abolish slavery, raised funds to pay for the freedom of runaway slaves, attended regional conventions, and wrote and lectured on the evils of slavery. Their tireless efforts resulted in the freedom of scores of slaves and helped galvanize Northerners’ opposition to slavery.

But, to the astonishment of Mott and Stanton, a debate over allowing women to participate in the proceedings in London dominated the opening session of the convention. After several hours, the delegates who opposed women’s participation prevailed. These delegates expressed the traditional view that woman’s place was demurely in the home . . .

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