Island on the Edge: Taiwan New Cinema and After

Island on the Edge: Taiwan New Cinema and After

Island on the Edge: Taiwan New Cinema and After

Island on the Edge: Taiwan New Cinema and After

Synopsis

This is the first English-language anthology on the Taiwan New Cinema and its legacy. It is an exciting collection which covers all the major filmmakers from Hou Hsiao Hsien and Edward Yang to Ang Lee and more. The volume gatehrs a range of essays that analyze individual films produced since the advent of the Taiwan New Cinema in the early 1980s.

Taiwan and its internationally renowned cinema are " on the edge" in more ways than one. For all of its history the island has been on the edge of larger geopolitical entities, subjected to invasions, migrations, incursions, and pressures. On the other hand, as one of the "Little Tiger" economies of Asia, it has been on the cutting edge of the Asian economic boom and of technological innovation; in recent years it has pioneered democratization of authoritarian regimes in East Asia.

Excerpt

Chris Berry and Feii Lu

Taiwan and its internationally renowned cinema are “on the edge” in more ways than one. As we outline in this introduction, for all its history the island has been on the edge of larger geopolitical entities, and subjected to invasions, migrations, incursions, and pressures. As one of the “Little Tiger” economies of Asia, however, it has been on the cutting edge of the Asian economic boom and technological innovation, and in recent years it has pioneered democratization of authoritarian regimes in East Asia.

Furthermore, for almost twenty years since the advent of the Taiwan New Cinema in the early 1980s, while they have been at the cinematic cutting edge, filmmakers from Taiwan have also been on the edge of economic disaster, not only locally, but also internationally. Hou Hsiao Hsien’s early films The Boys from Fengkuei, A Summer at Grandpa’s, The Time to Live and the Time to Die, and Dust in the Wind won awards at festivals everywhere from Locarno to Turin, Nantes, Rotterdam and Berlin. However, his big international breakthrough came when City of Sadness topped the Taiwan box office and won the Best Film award at Venice in 1989, and he has been a fixture on the international festival circuit ever since. His peer Edward Yang picked up a Silver Leopard at Locarno for The Terrorizerm. 1987, and also became a fixture on the international scene. He reached new highs with Vi Yi in 2000, which netted him Best Director at Cannes and numerous other awards. Young directors from Taiwan are also feted. Tsai Mingliang won the Venice Golden Lion for Vive L’Amour in 1994, and has picked up at least one major award for every film he has made since. In addition to . . .

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