Competence-Based Assessment

Competence-Based Assessment

Competence-Based Assessment

Competence-Based Assessment

Synopsis

"Competence-based assessment is the cornerstone of the UK Government's reforms of vocational training and of non-academic, full-time education post-16. Australia has adopted similar policies, and there is considerable interest in the notion of 'competence' in both Europe and North America. Alison Wolf describes the main characteristics of the competence-based approach as it has emerged in the UK, and traces its origins in American experimental programmes of the 1970s. The arguments for the approach are discussed in detail. She then analyses the theoretical assumptions which competence-based assessment shares with the criterion-referenced movement as a whole, and synthesizes the growing body of evidence on implementation. Finally, she reviews the prospects for competence-based awards, and offers some conclusions on what is essential to a competence-based approach. Alison Wolf is a Reader in Education at the Institute of Education, University of London." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Changing theories and methods of assessment have been the focus of significant attention for some years now, not only in the United Kingdom, but also in many other western industrial countries and many developing countries. Critics of contemporary education and training systems argue that real change will not take place in schools and colleges if traditional examinations remain unchanged to exert a constraining influence on how teachers and students approach new curricula or other forms of learning opportunities. Similarly, examiners have been concerned to develop more valid and ‘authentic’ ways of assessing the changes which have been introduced into schools and colleges over recent years — more practical work, oral work, problem solving, work simulation and so forth. In turn psychologists and sociologists have become concerned with the impact of assessment on learning and motivation, and how that impact can be developed more positively. This has led to a myriad of developments in the field of assessment, often involving an increasing role for the teacher in school or college-based assessment, as more relevant and challenging tasks are devised by examination agencies for administration by teachers in situ, and as the role and status of more routine teacher assessment of . . .

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