Education Reform: A Critical and Post-Structural Approach

Education Reform: A Critical and Post-Structural Approach

Education Reform: A Critical and Post-Structural Approach

Education Reform: A Critical and Post-Structural Approach

Synopsis

"This book builds upon Stephen J. Ball's previous work in the field of education policy analysis. It subjects the ongoing reforms in UK education to a rigorous critical interrogation. It takes as its main concerns the introduction of market forces, managerialism and the national curriculum into the organization of schools and the work of teachers. The author argues that these reforms are combining to fundamentally reconstruct the work of teaching, to generate and ramify multiple inequalities and to destroy civic virtue in education. The effects of the market and management are not technical and neutral but are essentially political and moral. The reforms taking place in the UK are both a form of cultural and social engineering and an attempt to recreate a fantasy education based upon myths of national identity, consensus and glory. The analysis is founded within policy sociology and employ both ethnographic and post-structuralist methods." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Versions of most of the chapters in this volume have appeared in print previously but all have been revised, most very significantly. Chapter 2 was originally published in Discourse (13/2, 1993); Chapter 3 in Curriculum Studies (41/2, 1993); Chapter 4 in the British Journal of Educational Studies (41/2,1993); Chapter 5 in Smyth, J. (ed.) (1993); Chapter 6 in Crump, S. (ed.) School Centred Leadership, Melbourne, Nelson (1993); Chapter 7 in the British Journal of Sociology of Education (14/1, 1993); Chapter 8 was given as a symposium paper at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Atlanta, April 1993 and later appeared in the Journal of Curriculum and Supervision (1994).

A lot of friends and colleagues have given help and support in the development of the material presented here; none more so than my research collaborators Richard Bowe and Sharon Gewirtz. Meg Maguire, Alan Cribb, Trinidad Ball, Barry Troyna, John Fitz, Geoff Whitty, David Hal pin, Miriam David, Carole Vincent, Anne West, Stephen Crump, Tony Knight, Margaret Brown, John Evans, Chris Shilling, Sara Kelly and my SIPS colleagues at King's also offered important comments and criticisms, all of which I tried to take seriously, and gave their support, for which I am grateful. I am also grateful to John Skelton for his interest in my work. Most important to the completion of the project and to me is Trinidad, who continues to tolerate my preoccupations.

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