Water for Sale: How Business and the Market Can Resolve the World's Water Crisis

Water for Sale: How Business and the Market Can Resolve the World's Water Crisis

Water for Sale: How Business and the Market Can Resolve the World's Water Crisis

Water for Sale: How Business and the Market Can Resolve the World's Water Crisis

Synopsis

More than a billion people worldwide lack access to clean, safe water. Some 12 million people die annually as a result, and millions more are struck by diseases associated with the lack of sanitary water. Those afflicted live mainly in poor countries where water distribution is run by inefficient public providers—97 percent of all water distribution in poor countries is public.

In recent years, a small number of developing country governments have turned to the private sector for help. Swedish activist and author Fredrik Segerfeldt shows how millions of new households in places as diverse as Argentina, the Philippines, Cambodia, and Morocco, have been connected to water networks as a result of private investment.

But “privatization” of water distribution has met with stiff resistance. A coalition of NGOs and special interests argues that water is a human right and that the private sector would hike rates beyond the ability of the poor to pay. Segerfeldt reviews cases of privatization and shows that most claims of the anti-privatization lobby are unfounded.

The very poor who are not connected to any water network have the most to gain from privatization since the rates they pay — 12 times more on average than the price of network water — fall dramatically when private companies connect them to the network. Using statistical data Segerfeldt warns against the tragic consequences of paying heed to those who are driven by an anti-business ideological agenda rather than a desire to try policies that actually help the poor.

Excerpt

When I told friends and colleagues I was writing a book about water, and the role of markets and the private sector in water distribution in developing countries, most of them frowned and asked why. True, at first this seems to be a very technical and narrow subject. But on closer inspection, one comes to realize that there is a global drama taking place. It is not primarily about water technology; it is about more than a billion people around the world lacking access to clean and safe water, which causes 12 million deaths a year. Therefore, this became more a mission of life and death than yet another boring technical study. It is my hope that readers will find the book as important as I think the topic is.

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