Practice with Purpose: Literacy Work Stations for Grades 3-6

Practice with Purpose: Literacy Work Stations for Grades 3-6

Practice with Purpose: Literacy Work Stations for Grades 3-6

Practice with Purpose: Literacy Work Stations for Grades 3-6

Synopsis

Offers guidance on establishing routines for independent reading and response writing, as well as step-by-step instructions on how to set up and manage a variety of hands-on literacy work stations appropriate for intermediate students.

Excerpt

Two students sit at a small table by a bulletin board. They are each writing something different. Maria is completing an adventure story about two fourthgrade friends; she has been writing this short chapter book for about a week and uses her time at the writing work station to continue what she did in writing workshop. Each student has a writing folder stored in a crate under the writing work station table so it is easy for them to access their work. Miguel is working on a poem about hurricanes; he has enjoyed studying this topic in science and is writing about what he learned in this poem. He plans to post his poem at this station when it is finished. Maria refers to the editing suggestions on the nearby bulletin board after she finishes writing her chapter. Then she gives it to Miguel to read for feedback. She is eager to publish this piece so it can be placed in the classroom library. When finished, Miguel asks her to listen to his poem so far. He will put it in the works-in-progress section of his writing folder and work on it next time he comes to the writing work station.

In another classroom down the hall, two students sit on the floor at their writing work station. Their teacher has created a writing space with a trifold science project board, which is propped up beside them to create a writing nook. They are reading a list of possible writing ideas on the project board and talking about what they will write about next. They decide to write a ballad about the Oregon Trail, a topic they have recently studied. They look through a notebook of sample ballads the teacher has collected and placed in this station for help. Then they clip a blank piece of paper onto a clipboard and begin to write together. the writing partners periodically refer to their social studies book, which the teacher has placed in a basket labeled “Reference Materials.” They also pull out a copy of The Scholastic Rhyming Dictionary to help them with word choice.

All these writers have specific purposes and audiences in mind. They are using tools the teacher has provided right there in the writing work station so they have easy access. They are . . .

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