Backwaters of Global Prosperity: How Forces of Globalization and GATT/WTO Trade Regimes Contribute to the Marginalization of the World's Poorest Nations

Backwaters of Global Prosperity: How Forces of Globalization and GATT/WTO Trade Regimes Contribute to the Marginalization of the World's Poorest Nations

Backwaters of Global Prosperity: How Forces of Globalization and GATT/WTO Trade Regimes Contribute to the Marginalization of the World's Poorest Nations

Backwaters of Global Prosperity: How Forces of Globalization and GATT/WTO Trade Regimes Contribute to the Marginalization of the World's Poorest Nations

Synopsis

From direct foreign investment to the flow of capital, there are endless factors that affect the economies of the world's poorest countries. Knowledge of the struggles of these countries- also known as the Least Developed Countries (LDCs)- is essential to understanding the impact of globalization. This work provides a platform for grasping why developed countries are reaping the benefits of globalization while the LDCs are being left behind.

Topical chapters seek to uncover the processes that LDCs should take to reverse their marginalization and build their economies so that they can receive the benefits of globalization. Subjects include:
• The relationship between the World Trade Organization, World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund
• Multilateral trade regimes
• Tariff and non-tariff barriers in developed countries
• Global Commodity Prices
• Trends in Poverty and Human Development
• Technology

Excerpt

This book is a culmination of my research, publications, and presentations on the GATT/WTO-related issues over the last decade. The work on this manuscript, however, began in earnest in 2000, with a Japan Foundation Fellowship. I am profoundly grateful to the Japan Foundation, and also to the Otaru University of Commerce, for providing me with excellent research and residential facilities. At Otaru, a panoramic seaport of Hokkaido, I also benefited immensely from frequent discussions with Professors Nakamura Hideo and Omori Yoshiaki of OUC, Richard Siddle of Sheffield University (a visiting professor at OUC at that time), and Tomichi Hoshino of Toyoma University, whose intense philosophical insights left indelible marks in my memory. A word of thanks is also due to the Kansai Gaidai University-Osaka, where an outline of the book drew a barrage of questions from enthusiastic audience in March 2001.

My research on this project, however, continued in 2002, when I moved to New York as a visiting scholar with Columbia University. I am grateful to Professor Phillip Oldenburg of the South Asian Institute for granting me unfettered access to the enormous library resources at Columbia. Completion of the project, however, took another full year, when I joined the economics faculty of the City University of New York. I am grateful to Dr. Joseph Culkin, chairman of the Department of Social Sciences, and Dr. Eduwardo Marti, president of the CUNY-Queensborough College, for actively encouraging my research through course release and other supports.

I owe a word of thanks to scores of international organizations, like the World Bank, the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), the World Food Program (WFP), German GTZ, and . . .

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