Getting It Right the First Time: How Innovative Companies Anticipate Demand

Getting It Right the First Time: How Innovative Companies Anticipate Demand

Getting It Right the First Time: How Innovative Companies Anticipate Demand

Getting It Right the First Time: How Innovative Companies Anticipate Demand

Synopsis

"In Getting It Right the First Time, John Katsaros and Peter Christy argue that the most successful businesses will be those that accurately predict market conditions - especially the market changes that will occur within the crucial 18-to-36-month innovation window. Showcasing dozens of colorful examples of lucrative successes and missed opportunities (from high-tech to financial services to medical devices), the authors present a detailed plan for how you and your company can learn to: identify your top customers in advance of entering the market, successfully position your company and its products to those customers, and catch emerging trends before your competitors do." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

One of the benefits of working in Silicon Valley is the somewhat regular ritual of cleaning out your desk when you are moving on to a new job. There is nothing close to job security in the high-tech world, and you end up getting real good at starting over. If my dear father, who worked for one company his entire life, had lived to see his son change jobs more often than he changed cars, he would have been appalled. Today the following story seems closer to the truth: someone looking for a new job after twenty years with a prestigious computer company is told, “I like your background but I don’t understand why you’d work for those guys for so long. There most be something wrong with you.”

About twenty-five years ago, while cleaning out my desk when leaving one of my first marketing jobs, I clearly remember finding a sales lead listing from one of the early trade shows that we had attended to introduce a new product. I was struck by the fact that stuck in among a couple of hundred names on that list were names of people that I was quite familiar with because they eventually became our customers. In fact, most of our biggest customers’ names were on that list. At the time I thought it interesting, but odd. If only we knew then what we knew now, selling directly to the names on this list would have saved us years of marketing time and lots of advertising money.

A few years later, while I was once again cleaning out my desk from a sales assignment the same thing happened. I found a list of names from an early trade show and—you guessed it—scattered throughout this list were the names of our most important customers. And, of course, the same thoughts crossed through my mind—what if we had . . .

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