Knowledge Creation, Diffusion, and Use in Innovation Networks and Knowledge Clusters: A Comparative Systems Approach across the United States, Europe, and Asia

Knowledge Creation, Diffusion, and Use in Innovation Networks and Knowledge Clusters: A Comparative Systems Approach across the United States, Europe, and Asia

Knowledge Creation, Diffusion, and Use in Innovation Networks and Knowledge Clusters: A Comparative Systems Approach across the United States, Europe, and Asia

Knowledge Creation, Diffusion, and Use in Innovation Networks and Knowledge Clusters: A Comparative Systems Approach across the United States, Europe, and Asia

Synopsis

In the 21st century, intangible resources such as knowledge and social capital have become as necessary to the modern economy as coal, diamonds, and oil were to the past. This shift from product-focused to service-focused economies necessitates a drastic re-thinking of the ways in which we support the mission and business of economic development on a global, regional, and national scale. In order to effect and sustain a positive change, innovation and knowledge networks need to be connected to every aspect of life, from the private and domestic, to the corporate and the global. This book integrates a wide variety of perspectives and treatises on mutually adaptive and complementary processes of knowledge generation, diffusion, and transfer within organizations and industry, addressing both the "what" and "how to" questions of knowledge management in a conceptual as well as an applied manner. It should be of strong interest to science and technology policy makers, research and development managers, business decision makers, and students of innovation and knowledge dynamics alike.

Excerpt

Under the comprehensive umbrella term of Mode 3 our interest is to put a conceptual link between systems and systems theory on the one hand, and their application to knowledge on the other hand. Systems can be understood as being composed of elements, which are tied together by a self-rationale. For innovation, often innovation clusters and innovation networks are being regarded as important. Leveraging systems theory for innovation concepts, one can draw a referential line between the elements of a system and clusters (innovation clusters) and the self-rationale of a system and networks (innovation networks). One advantage of this approach is that it makes the tools of systems theory effectively available for research about innovation. Also from original research about the European Union the concept of a multilevel hierarchy promises conceptual opportunities. Further integrating systems theory, we can speak of multilevel systems of knowledge (following different levels of aggregation) and multilevel systems of innovation (also following different levels of aggregation). The popular and powerful concept of the national innovation system is being chronically challenged by ongoing processes of supranational and global integration. Conceptually unlocking the national innovation systems in favor of a broader multilevel logic implies further accepting the existence of national innovation systems, but, at the same time, emphasizing also their global embeddedness. Our suggested catch-phrase of Mode 3, therefore, integrates several considerations that want to relate systems theory, knowledge, and innovation more directly and should be understood as a contribution to the general discourse.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.