Political Parties in Post-Soviet Space: Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, and the Baltics

Political Parties in Post-Soviet Space: Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, and the Baltics

Political Parties in Post-Soviet Space: Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, and the Baltics

Political Parties in Post-Soviet Space: Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, and the Baltics

Synopsis

Anatoly Kulik and Susanna Pshizova have compiled an engaging and comprehensive, cross-national study that explores the stormy political developments in the post-Soviet countries. They gathered essays regarding the formation of the various new democratic institutions of Russia, the Baltic States, the Slavic States, and Moldova. The contributors are all distinguished scholars indigenous to their areas of focus; consequently, they are able to provide a true insider's perspective of the political climates of their respective lands. Kulik and Pshizova have organized the studies into seven generously detailed, nation-specific chapters that permit readers to see the individual party systems in both their sub-regional contexts as well as in their national ones.

The Newly Independent States that appeared after the collapse of the Soviet Union faced the necessity of creating their own democratic political systems in the first months of independence. While each state had the same basic task and came out of roughly the same background, each country implemented its own methods of government rule: they each pursued different paths with different outcomes. It is logical to view and study the states as a group, but also necessary to see them as individual governments with individual policies and political cultures.

Excerpt

Political Parties in Post-Soviet Space is the fifth book in the series “Political Parties in Context” for which I serve as the Series Editor. Like all the other volumes to date, this one draws exclusively from the work of indigenous scholars, authors who live and work in the countries about which they are writing, and who know their political development and their contemporary party systems from personal experience as well as academic study. The goal is always to permit such scholars to discuss their nations’ political parties as they see fit—to give the essential basic information, but also to give the fullest and most honest interpretation of the meaning of the history and the structures they discuss. They have not been asked to follow anyone’s theory of political parties (though they draw on various theories that interest them); they have been asked to tell the truth as they see it.

That may seem a simple enough goal, and an easy plan to carry out. But those who know anything of the tumultuous times these nations have lived through in the past three decades, and the impact such times have had on the lives of scholars as well as on the lives of political parties, will understand that producing this volume has been anything but a simple task. Nonetheless, Editors Anatoly Kulik and Susanna Pshizova have found and guided scholars from all seven nations who have been willing to take on this challenge, and who have met it handsomely.

A unique feature of this volume is the organization of Parts II and III, both of which begin with overview chapters, permitting readers to see the individual party systems in their sub-regional as well as national contexts. In addition, the introduction and conclusion give each of the individual . . .

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