What Every New Manager Needs to Know: Making a Successful Transition to Management

What Every New Manager Needs to Know: Making a Successful Transition to Management

What Every New Manager Needs to Know: Making a Successful Transition to Management

What Every New Manager Needs to Know: Making a Successful Transition to Management

Synopsis

"Companies depend on the ability of managers to fulfill organizational vision and meet crucial objectives. But without a firm grasp of critical management competencies, new managers' own futures -- as well as the company's -- can be at serious risk. What Every New Manager Needs to Know gives readers the skills they need to excel in their new responsibilities, such as managing the relationship between individual and team performance, making key people decisions like hiring, coaching and evaluating, developing budgets, and mastering the skills of project management. The book explores the key roles managers must take on in different situations, and answers fundamental questions like:
• What does it mean to be a manager?• What work can be delegated to others?• When is it -- and isn't it -- appropriate to take on an active leadership role?Featuring examples and stories, What Every New Manager Needs to Know shows newly appointed managers how to think outside the cubicle and excel in their new roles."

Excerpt

What Every New Manager Needs to Know grew out of a concern that organizations continue to struggle in developing managers who are expected to take on demanding management responsibilities. During my tenure as a 3M executive I often faced the situation when a management position became available that someone would ask me: [I'd like to have my name put on the list.] I usually responded with a rather simple question: [What have you done to prepare yourself for a position in management?] The response and subsequent discussion forced me to question just why and how this individual reached the conclusion to forsake a career as a competent discipline specialist and become involved in management.

From my experiences as an adjunct professor in management at the graduate level I find it troubling that few students fully understand what management involves. I also find that many students who have aspirations to pursue the management ladder have little if any knowledge of the demands placed on managers and of the scope of their responsibilities. They focus more on the tools of management than on the thought processes required to manage for both the short and long term. They also have relatively low levels of confidence in their immediate managers and don't see their managers as models to emulate or as proactive take-charge leaders.

When organizations need to fill such critical positions as managing the activities of others, why would they appoint people who are not adequately prepared? It is generally accepted that it takes years of schooling and practice to develop professionals in disciplines like science, engineering, finance, and law, but when it comes to the discipline of management people assume that anyone can manage anything without any formal preparation. Not so. The discipline of management is probably the most difficult of all disciplines: it involves dealing with human behavior, which doesn't follow . . .

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