Marx on Globalisation

Marx on Globalisation

Marx on Globalisation

Marx on Globalisation

Synopsis

This comprehensive introduction to Karl Marx's political economy includes extracts from The Communist Manifesto, Capital, The Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844, and The Poverty of Philosophy. This new selection from the writings of both Marx and Frederick Engels aims to enrich current discussions, offering in-depth analyses of the processes of international capital and by giving a sense of the long-term nature of the trends within global capitalism. Also included is a discussion of globalization and a critique on capitalism.

Excerpt

Globalisation, as a process, has a long history, the creation and expan
sion of the United Nations and many other multinational
organisations, steady growth in world commerce, development of
internationalised knowledge systems in symbiosis with social evolu
tion – implying changed patterns of communication, technology,
production and consumption, and the promotion of internationalism
as a cultural value. Few sections of the global population escaped the
effects of two world wars and the Depression between them, despite
wide differences in the various degrees of participation or even inter
est. The technological revolution lies at the heart of an accelerating
globalisation process; it has introduced fundamental changes in the
international system. International market forces increasingly shape
economies and national cultures. Capital, information, and images flow
around the globe at the speed of light. Trade, finance, science and tech
nology, mass media, consumer patterns, and social and environmental
problems are all globalising swiftly.

Independent Commission on Population and the
Quality of Life,
1996

What is globalisation? For writers situated across the political spectrum, globalisation theory offers the most convincing account of the economic changes which shape the world today. In Britain, the Financial Times perceives a world market liberated from ‘constraints of time, place and currency’. In the Guardian, Larry Elliott argues that ‘the globalised market and new technologies have put an end to the idea of a job for life.’ For Naomi Klein, George Monbiot and the anticapitalists of the global protest movement, the term globalisation conjures up images of a nightmarish society, manipulated by a tiny number of mega-corporations, including Coke, Pepsi, MacDonalds . . .

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