Autobiography of a Theory: Developing the Theory of Living Human Systems and Its Systems-Centered Practice

Autobiography of a Theory: Developing the Theory of Living Human Systems and Its Systems-Centered Practice

Autobiography of a Theory: Developing the Theory of Living Human Systems and Its Systems-Centered Practice

Autobiography of a Theory: Developing the Theory of Living Human Systems and Its Systems-Centered Practice

Synopsis

"In this book Yvonne Agazarian traces the evolution of her ideas and their application to create a meta-theory, the theory of living human systems. Autobiography of a Theory follows Agazarian as she thinks her way through different stages, creating a theoretical background for SAVI (System for Analyzing Verbal Interaction), which she developed with Anita Simon, developing a theory of the Invisible Group for the book she wrote with Richard Peters and expanding on existing group dynamics theories." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Curiosity Killed the Cat – Information Brought it Back!

When Nanny answered my ‘whys’ with ‘because the sky is so high’, I’d ask, ‘How high is the sky?’ When she cautioned me that ‘Curiosity killed the cat’, I would say, ‘Information brought it back’, and sometimes, when I was feeling very uppity, ‘Well, I must have nine lives then.’ It was not that I asked different questions from the questions that every child asks, it was that I asked them all the time whenever I could. When Nanny would say that I must not ask any more questions for ten minutes, I would explain that they filled me up inside and I’d burst if I couldn’t let them out. and that indeed, was how I felt.

As I was a child of the early 1930s (I was born in 1929), I was brought up to be seen and not heard. All the questions that built up inside me would burst out as soon as I was with Nanny. Nanny, somewhat understandably, often took refuge in the kitchen with Cook and Edith and Maisy (why was I not allowed in the kitchen?) bringing me up my meals and going back down again, while I made mountains and rivers and forests out of my food. It never seemed strange to me that, although I had a Nanny, I often played alone.

When the weather was good enough I was let out to play in the garden, watching the shadow of the house travel slowly back over the lawn (why do shadows move when nobody is moving them?). When the weather was bad, I would play in the nursery. There was a gate at the nursery door and I spent much time leaning over the gate listening to the house. I became very good at knowing what was going on by the noises and voices that drifted up the stairwell.

There was a difference in the voice tone of the servants when ‘we’ were in and when ‘we’ were out. Later I was to recognize what a difference the environment makes in who one is. Then I simply knew that if I called out when the servants had their ‘out’ voices, they would come to visit me, and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.