Children Who Commit Acts of Serious Interpersonal Violence: Messages for Best Practice

Children Who Commit Acts of Serious Interpersonal Violence: Messages for Best Practice

Children Who Commit Acts of Serious Interpersonal Violence: Messages for Best Practice

Children Who Commit Acts of Serious Interpersonal Violence: Messages for Best Practice

Synopsis

Children Who Commit Acts of Serious Interpersonal Violence explores risk management and successful intervention for children in public care who have committed, or are at risk of committing, acts of serious violence. The contributors identify different subgroups of children who are difficult to place, including those who sexually offend and those who murder, and outline the key characteristics and patterns of need they display. They provide an overview of the risk factors leading to extremely violent behavior and discuss the complexities of diagnosis and definition from a legal perspective. The book proposes strategies for effectively managing these children, drawing evidence from international practice and research projects. It highlights the limitations of current structures and makes recommendations for future development.

Excerpt

This book addresses the needs of a particular group of children who present not as victims but as perpetrators. Their vulnerability is difficult to recognise and accept because their victims, often vulnerable children themselves because of age or disability, are immediately more deserving of sympathy and help. However, the work of nch – the Bridge Child Care Development Service, especially through its analysis of particular cases involving the lives of children who had been abused, served to illustrate once again that it is often sad children who do bad things. It is not uncommon to hear about neighbourhood children who are disruptive or terrorising and to hear, at least through gossip, that caring relationships for them have always been fraught. It is perhaps then not surprising that children with abusive and neglectful home lives are often over-represented in the statistics relating to imprisonment and crime. They are also over-represented in statistics relating to prostitution, homelessness, drug dependency and other factors associated with social exclusion and crime. Therefore, while taking steps to protect society at large, our commitment to all children dictates that we should try to understand how this happens and begin to work actively to stop it.

For this reason I am delighted that the Oak Foundation, which commits its resources to address issues of global and social concern, was able to fund the initiative that brought European organisations together to discuss this group of children and resulted in this impressive book. It would appear that we know how to describe these children and at least some of the factors that contribute towards their later dangerous behaviour. What we need to do now is to provide reliable services for them. I hope this book will be a step in that direction.

Florence Bruce Senior Programme Officer, Child Abuse Programme Oak Foundation

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.