The New European Diasporas: National Minorities and Conflict in Eastern Europe

The New European Diasporas: National Minorities and Conflict in Eastern Europe

The New European Diasporas: National Minorities and Conflict in Eastern Europe

The New European Diasporas: National Minorities and Conflict in Eastern Europe

Synopsis

"The European upheavals of the twentieth century have left in their wake a series of national minorities in Eastern Europe. These "new diasporas" have been created by the movement not of people but of borders. The interaction of these minorities, the new states in which they are located, and the homeland states where their co-nationals predominate and from which they have been separated is the leading cause of large-scale conflict in the wake of communism's collapse. The politics of four of these European "national triads" - Hungarians, Russians, Serbs, and Albanians - is the focus of this important book." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

The most important international event of the last year of the twentieth century, NATO’s war in Yugoslavia, had its origins in a dispute over borders between two national groups—Serbs and Albanians. They had lived together, if uneasily, for most of the twentieth century as part of a multinational state: Yugoslavia. When it collapsed and borders were redrawn, the Kosovar Albanians were dissatisfied at remaining part of the Serb-dominated lesser Yugoslavia. They rebelled, triggering a civil war into which nato intervened in March 1999.

The circumstances that produced the initial fighting between Serbs and Albanians were not unique. the upheavals in Europe in the course of the century, beginning with the Balkan war that led to the establishment of an independent Albanian state and included Kosovo in Serbia in 1913, have left in their wake a series of national minorities in Eastern Europe.

These “new diasporas” have been created by the movement not of people but of borders. the interaction of these minorities, the new states in which they are located, and the homeland states where their conationals predominate and from which they have been separated is the leading cause of large-scale conflict in the wake of the collapse of communism. the politics of four of these European “national triads” is the subject of this book.

Hungary sided with Germany in World War II in an unsuccessful attempt to reincorporate Hungarians who had been assigned to other countries by the post-World War I settlement. the status of these Hungarian diasporas remains today, as Bennett Kovrig describes in chapter 1, a major issue for Hungary. the Russian diaspora is the largest and potentially the most explosive in Eastern Europe. An estimated 25 million ethnic Russians live outside the borders of the Russian Federation. How they have adapted to the status of national minorities thrust upon . . .

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