Vergil's Aeneid: Hero, War, Humanity

Vergil's Aeneid: Hero, War, Humanity

Vergil's Aeneid: Hero, War, Humanity

Vergil's Aeneid: Hero, War, Humanity

Synopsis

One of the pillars of the Western literary tradition, Vergil's Aeneid has it all: adventures on the high seas, battles, passion, monsters, magic, and struggles that test the mettle of both man and woman. G. B. Cobbold joined with Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers to produce the Aeneid as the grand and rousing story that it is. Cobbold's command of Latin and commitment to a strong narrative line have produced an Aeneid like no other: a fresh and page-turning rendition that reads like an epic novel, with engaging and helpful reader aids. Features: Introduction to the Aeneid and Vergil Vivid novelistic rendition with marginal summaries and 92 dynamic in-text original illustrations by Thom Kapheim Map of Aeneas' voyage Glossary of characters Family trees of main characters and gods Book-by-book outline of the plot Timeline of significant events in Roman history Questions for reflection and discussion.

Excerpt

This is a story of a war—and the story of a warrior, the first of the fugitives from Troy to make his way to Italy. Constantly driven off course by fate, or by the power of the gods, and harassed by Juno’s relentless anger, he came ashore at last in Latium—but even there a long and bitter conflict lay ahead of him before he could establish a city and a home for his ancestral gods. But his descendants would be the founding fathers of Alba Longa, and one day they would build the walls of everlasting Rome.

What was the cause of all his trials? This man was famous for his obedience to the gods, so what had he done to offend Juno, the queen of the gods? Why did she make him suffer so much, and put so many obstacles in his way? Is a desire for vengeance a mark of the immortals?

Many years before, colonists from Tyre in Phoenicia had come to Libya and founded an aggressive, prosperous city that they called Carthage; it lies a long way from Italy, due south from the mouth of the river Tiber. It was well known that Juno favored Carthage more than anywhere else on earth, more even than Samos where she was born; and in Carthage she kept her armor and her chariot. The Carthaginians were very dear to her, and she hoped and prayed that they would become very powerful. But she had also heard what the fates had in fact decided: that the descendants of this man from Troy would one day govern a proud empire of their own, and that they would invade Libya, and that her beloved Carthage would fall.

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