International Migration, Remittances, and Brain Drain

International Migration, Remittances, and Brain Drain

International Migration, Remittances, and Brain Drain

International Migration, Remittances, and Brain Drain

Synopsis

Customers in Western Europe and Japan please order from Palgrave Macmillan by visiting their website at www.palgrave.com. QUOTEInevitably, international migration is poised to be one of the biggest challenges to, and also opportunities for, world development in the twenty-first century. This volume greatly enhances our understanding of its causes and consequences and should help us to think of better policies, by both developed and developing countries, to manage this critical phenomenon. QUOTE-Ernesto Zedillio Director, Yale Center for the Study of Globalization Former President of Mexico QUOTEThis volume is very timely, offering an invaluable view of the World Bank's ongoing research program on the links between international migration and economic development at a stage when this subject is receiving considerable global attention. QUOTE- Robert E. B. Lucas Professor of Economics, Boston University International migration, the movement of people across international boundaries, has enormous economic, social and cultural implications in both origin and destination countries. Using original research, this title examines the determinants of migration, the impact of remittances and migration on poverty, welfare, and investment decisions, and the consequences of brain drain, brain gain, and brain waste.

Excerpt

It is difficult to imagine global economic integration without migration as an integral part of it. Unlike what was observed in the 19 century, the big surge in international flows of goods and capital has not been matched by an equivalent flow of migrants in the post-World War II era. Will the tide turn around in the 21 century? There are some reasons to think so. Diverging demographic trends between the developing and developed countries and the rapid decline in transportation and telecommunications costs are making it increasingly difficult for governments’ current policies to restrain international migration. As a result, international migration and its related issues are likely to occupy an increasingly prominent place on the global agenda for the foreseeable future.

Yet our knowledge of the economic effects of migration, especially its impact on economic development, is rather limited. Although considerable effort has been made by economists and sociologists in developed countries to analyze the effects of migration in destination countries, comparatively little research has been conducted on the effects of migration on countries of origin and on development in general. In order to expand our knowledge on migration and to identify policies and reforms that will lead to superior development outcomes and to “win-win-win” results for both sets of countries and for the migrants, the Development Economics Research Group of the World Bank initiated the International Migration and Development Research Program. This volume presents the results of a first set of studies carried out within this program.

Economic research indicates that there are significant potential gains from the liberalization of immigration policies, and that these would accrue to all three sets of actors. On the other hand, international migration will likely entail various costs for these actors. For origin countries, these costs include the loss of skilled . . .

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