Early Childhood Services: Theory, Policy, and Practice

Early Childhood Services: Theory, Policy, and Practice

Early Childhood Services: Theory, Policy, and Practice

Early Childhood Services: Theory, Policy, and Practice

Synopsis

This book explores the relationships between theory, policy and practice in early childhood services. Although primarily focused on the UK, it draws on contributions from Europe and further afield to explore the strengths and limitations of present practices and suggests ways in which new initiatives might be developed.

The book considers six interlinked themes:

• How do young children learn? What assumptions are made about children as learners?

• What should young children be learning? What is an appropriate approach to curriculum for young children?

• Where should young children learn? What arrangements are made for them? What kinds of spaces do children inhabit?

• Who should help them learn? What role do adults take in supporting children's learning?

• Children as participants and knowledgeable persons. What contribution can children themselves make to the plans that are made for them?

• Developing practice - how does practice, particularly embedded practice, change or develop?

The book will be important reading for students undertaking courses in early childhood studies, early years education, social policy and child welfare as well as academics, researchers and policymakers in these fields.

Excerpt

This book is based on a series of international seminars, originally given at the Institute of Education, 1995–6, exploring ground breaking aspects of theory and practice in early childhood. the seminars, which were funded by the Baring Foundation, were intended to explore the strengths and limitations of present practices in early childhood and to suggest ways in which new initiatives might be developed. Contributors to the seminars were academics and practitioners from Denmark, Canada, Germany, Spain, Sweden and the uk and they presented their views and conclusions for discussion with a mixed audience of academics and practitioners. the seminars attracted much interest and there were lively debates about the issues raised. Childcare and education policy and practices in the uk rely on a particular rhetoric about children and what they need, and these seminars provided an opportunity to look at traditional ideas and practices with new eyes.

In this book the authors develop the ideas about theory, policy and practice raised in the seminar series, and their complex interrelationships. the book brings together papers; some have already been published as journal articles; some have been especially commissioned; and some were originally presented at the seminars. They give new angles on early childhood services from a variety of perspectives. They do not always agree in their approach, and they are not intended to present an alternative blueprint for how such services should be run. Instead, hopefully, they give us some fresh insights and new understandings about the services we currently have and may choose to develop.

The current debate in the uk about care and education in the early years relies on implicit and explicit theories about children’s development and the roles that adults adopt in relation to young children, and is sited in a particular policy context. the very language we use to describe what is provided for young children expresses our confusion and ambivalence . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.