Biblical Religion and Family Values: A Problem in the Philosophy of Culture

Biblical Religion and Family Values: A Problem in the Philosophy of Culture

Biblical Religion and Family Values: A Problem in the Philosophy of Culture

Biblical Religion and Family Values: A Problem in the Philosophy of Culture

Synopsis

Examines the relationship between religion and the family as fundamental forms of culture.

Excerpt

For some years now a rancorous debate has taken place in the United States, Canada, and other Western democracies concerning “family values.” It periodically subsides, only to flare up again as a result of a new development in social policy or some provocative media event. There are observers, including a number of social scientists, who believe that a full-blown “culture war” is occurring in their society and that the future of the family is the major battleground on which it is being fought.

Conservative religious cultural critics—reactionary and moderate—are prominent in cultural skirmishes over social policies relating to the family, and many contend that the attack on the traditional family by liberals, feminists, secular humanists, and others is tied to efforts to subvert the Judeo-Christian moral and cultural foundations of the Western democracies. A recurrent theme in conservative religious cultural criticism is that even in a pluralistic democracy, Biblical moral teaching, particularly with respect to family concerns, is a bulwark against cultural anarchy. Cultural observers who regard themselves as progressive, including liberal religionists, sometimes respond constructively to conservative religious “pro-family” polemics, but deeper philosophical issues concerning cultural relations of Biblical religion and the family—and religion and the family in general—have received sparse attention.

Given the importance of religion, the family, and culture in just about every society, including ours, we may safely assume that practical and intellectual benefits can be derived from philosophical reflection on the cultural relations of the family and religion. Perspectives engendered by patient philosophical analysis may reveal the arbitrariness of simplistic agendas for social action and . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.