Assessing and Promoting Resilience in Vulnerable Children - Vol. 3

Assessing and Promoting Resilience in Vulnerable Children - Vol. 3

Assessing and Promoting Resilience in Vulnerable Children - Vol. 3

Assessing and Promoting Resilience in Vulnerable Children - Vol. 3

Synopsis

This practical resource for work with vulnerable adolescents shows ways of promoting resilience and encouraging pro-social behavior. The authors discuss concerns pertinent to adolescence such as peer pressure and moral responsibility, drugs and sexual relationships. They suggest ways for practitioners to engage with and support young people who may have social or family problems.

Excerpt

Background information

Good educational attainment is associated with good outcomes and is therefore a protective factor that should be aimed for (Rutter 1991). School or college also offer a wide range of other opportunities to boost resilience, including acting as a complementary secure base, providing many opportunities for developing self-esteem and efficacy and opportunities for constructive contact with peers and supportive adults (Garbarino et al. 1992; Gilligan 1998).

It is now recognised that being accommodated away from home is likely to have a significant negative impact upon educational achievement (Jackson 1995; Parker et al. 1991). Government policy initiatives are aimed at this problem (Scottish Office 1999). When young people are accommodated away from home the focus of intervention during adolescence is often upon planning for moving on from local authority accommodation. Issues of education can be pushed to the background, especially if the young person has not been attending school for some time. However, there are such clear associations between early school leaving, lack of qualifications and poor long-term outcomes that it essential that the issue of education be kept as a priority throughout planning (Rutter 1991).

Although considerable strides in cognitive development occur during middle school years, cognitive processes continue to mature during adolescence. Through teenage years and into early adulthood, young people may move into the stage known as formal operations when the ability to grasp abstract concepts increases, when hypothetical reasoning becomes possible and logic is more sophisticated (Piaget 1952). Such cognitive skills are more likely to develop if the young person is . . .

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