The Medieval Concept of Time: Studies on the Scholastic Debate and Its Reception in Early Modern Philosophy

The Medieval Concept of Time: Studies on the Scholastic Debate and Its Reception in Early Modern Philosophy

The Medieval Concept of Time: Studies on the Scholastic Debate and Its Reception in Early Modern Philosophy

The Medieval Concept of Time: Studies on the Scholastic Debate and Its Reception in Early Modern Philosophy

Synopsis

This volume examines the changing perceptions of time in the transition from the medieval debate to early modern philosophy. Some of the foremost contemporary experts try to weave the various strands of the topic into a methodological and doctrinal whole. The book consists of 21 studies (19 in English, 2 in French) subdivided into five main sections, entitled respectively The Late Antique Legacy, The Scholastic Debate, Late Scholasticism, Time and Medicine, Early Modern Philosophy. Themes discussed include the reception of Aristotle's doctrine of time, the Augustinian and Neoplatonic heritage, the concepts of divine eternity and angelic duration, and the particular role attributed to time in medieval and early modern medicine. This collection of studies aims at offering a comprehensive historico-doctrinal analysis of one of the most fascinating topics in western intellectual history.

Excerpt

Time is, undoubtedly, one of the concepts which has consistently attracted the attention of scholars of medieval thought, starting with the pioneering research of Pierre Duhem, continuing with Augustin Mansion and Anneliese Maier, up to the recent works of Kurt Flasch, Udo Reinhold Jeck and many of the authors included in this volume. in the last two decades especially, the various general works on the subject have been complemented by numerous specific works focussing on individual authors or individual problematic aspects; these have made it possible to achieve a more detailed reconstruction of the pattern of medieval debates on the nature of time and duration. Now is perhaps an appropriate moment to evaluate the progress made hitherto and to identify new directions for research. the aim of this volume is, thus, twofold: to provide a document on the current state of research for reference and consultation as well as a reliable starting point for further, more specialised studies.

The perspective adopted for this collection of contributions is a long-term one, the intention being to trace a path through the most important milestones in the evolution of the concept of time from Late Antiquity up to the beginning of the Modern Age and to identify any persistence, either in a positive or negative sense, of medieval conceptions in the various currents of thought up to the 16th and 17th centuries (Late Scholasticism, Renaissance Naturalism, so-called Modem Science).

This was the line followed by the International Colloquium held in Bari from 10th to 12th December 1998 (entitled Le trasformazioni del concetto di tempo tra Medioevo e Età Moderna) which inspired this volume. For various reasons, however, not all the presentations from the Conference appear in this publication, while others have been added in order to give as detailed a picture as possible. the collection begins with an acknowledgement of the late antique sources (the Neo-Platonists and Augustine); considerable space is then devoted to examining certain particularly significant positions in the Scholastic debate of the 13th and 14th centuries (the reception of the Averroistic doctrine, Albert the Great, the German Dominican school, Duns Scotus and the Scotist school, Ockham and Buridan . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.