Tibet, Past and Present: Tibetan Studies 1 : Piats 2000 : Tibetan Studies : Proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, Leiden 2000

Tibet, Past and Present: Tibetan Studies 1 : Piats 2000 : Tibetan Studies : Proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, Leiden 2000

Tibet, Past and Present: Tibetan Studies 1 : Piats 2000 : Tibetan Studies : Proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, Leiden 2000

Tibet, Past and Present: Tibetan Studies 1 : Piats 2000 : Tibetan Studies : Proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, Leiden 2000

Synopsis

The proceedings of the seminars of the International Association for Tibetan Studies (IATS) have developed into the most representative world-wide cross-section of Tibetan Studies. They are an indispensable reference-work for anyone interested in Tibet and capture the cutting edge of Tibet-related research. This volume is the first of three volumes of general proceedings of the Ninth Seminar of the IATS. It presents a careful selection of scholarly and academic articles on Tibetan history, which includes contemporary developments as well as a compact, but significant, linguistic section. The complete series covers ten volumes. The other seven volumes are the outcome of expert panels. Of special interest to readers of this book may be the edited volumes by Christopher Beckwith (linguistics), Helmut Eimer and David Germano (Buddhist canon), Lawrence Epstein (Khams pa history), Deborah Klimburg-Salter (art history) and the third volume of the general proceedings (Bhutan and art history).

Excerpt

GUNTRAM HAZOD

1. The royal temple of Khra ‘brug in Lower Yar lung, which is considered to be Tibet’s first temple (cf., e.g., KK 301.17), appears in the post-dynastic sources under the name [G-yo ru] Khra ‘brug Bkra shis Byams snyoms, Byams snyoms mi ‘gyur, or more frequently, Byams pa mi ‘gyur[gling]. At the same time it is called pho brang, the royal residence or residence of the king’s (i.e. Srong btsan sgam po’s) new tutelary gods. The sources therefore also speak of pho brang Khra ‘brug or of pho brang Byams pa mi ‘gyur gling (cf. Sørensen, p. 160 and Gyalbo et.al. p.36f.). In the same sources the latter place, pho brang Byams pa mi ‘gyur[gling], is named as the birthplace of King Srong btsan sgam po, which refers to a place in Rgya ma south-east of Mal gro Gung dkar.

The oral tradition (first mentioned by Richardson), is not the only evidence of Byams pa mi ‘gyur in Rgya ma as the king’s birthplace. There are also definite textual testimonies. Thus the Vaiḍūrya ser po (166.5) gives the birthplace more precisely as Rgya ma mda’ pho brang Byams pa mi ‘gyur gling, that is, in the lower Rgya ma valley. Similarly, clear indications are to be found in Rva lo rnam thar

The inquiries forming the basis of this paper have been carried out in the course of research projects supported by the Österreichische Fonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. The in situ surveys were carried out together with my colleague Tsering Gyalbo, whom I also wish to thank for his support in the evaluation of the data. Pasang Wangdu and Per K. Sørensen supplied important information and suggestions for this paper.

Cf., e.g., KK 98.6f., 99.6–10; DEU 294.17; NYANG 166.12f.; YC 51.15f.; Sørensen, pp.160f..

The valley begins north of the great watershed, approximately where the boundary ran between the Left and Central Horn province (Dbu ru, G-yo ru), i.e. the Dmal (~Rmal, ~Dma’) la la rgyud in the written sources (DEU 272.10–14) (Fig. 1). According to the locals one of the best connecting routes ran over the eastern passes and over ‘On down to the Gtsang po. ‘On lies opposite to the entrance of the Yar lung valley. A western route leads from Rgya ma to Bsam yas.

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